Broker Check

Call Us Today!  704-947-6985

"I can do all things through Him who gives me strength."

- Philippians 4:1


How the Cost of Living Might Affect Your Monthly Budget

| December 01, 2021
Share |

If you're one of America's 64 million Social Security beneficiaries, you might want to prepare yourself for a significant pay raise. 

According to the Social Security Administration, the annual cost-of-living (COLA) benefits increase starts with the year you turn 62, and the COLA increase announced in October was 5.9%. Continued inflationary pressure as the economy recovers from the pandemic-induced recession means that in 2022, Social Security recipients will receive the most significant increase in benefits since 1983.

What does this mean for your retirement income?

Before getting the adjusted Social Security check, you may want to look at your monthly budget and see how you can put the extra money to use. The costs of everything from gas to food to utilities have increased, and you'll want to earmark your extra income accordingly. 

Be aware that anyone on Medicare or Medicaid will likely not feel the effects of a full 5.9% bump because of increased premiums associated with health care and Medicare Part B in particular. These payments are generally taken out of Social Security and could impact the adjustment you see.  

If Social Security checks are your only income, there generally won't be any change in taxes. However, if you're someone who draws on other retirement savings in addition to Social Security or is working and receiving benefits, part of your checks may become taxable. Taxpayers who receive other sources of income over the threshold amounts in addition to Social Security benefits should prepare to see an increase in their tax bill.

Social Security payments, alongside other income, can impact your tax bracket during your retirement years, so diligence is required to ensure you're keeping yourself in the lowest tax bracket possible. Call us today, and together, we can determine any necessary changes.

----

This document is for educational purposes only and should not be construed as legal or tax advice. One should consult a legal or tax professional regarding their own personal situation. Any comments regarding safe and secure investments and guaranteed income streams refer only to fixed insurance products offered by an insurance company. They do not refer in any way to securities or investment advisory products Insurance policy applications are vetted through an underwriting process set forth by the issuing insurance company. Some applications may not be accepted based upon adverse underwriting results.  Death benefit payouts are based upon the claims paying ability of the issuing insurance company. The firm providing this document is not affiliated with the Social Security Administration or any other government entity.

By clicking on these links, you will leave our server, as they are located on another server. We have not independently verified the information available through this link. The link is provided to you as a matter of interest. Please click on the links below to leave and proceed to the selected site.

[1] https://www.ssa.gov/news/press/releases/2021/#10-2021-2
[2] https://www.cnbc.com/2021/10/17/people-will-get-bigger-social-security-checks-in-2022-how-to-prepare.html

Share |